NAACP Names 44-Year-Old Woman to Chair Organization

Appointment Marks a Generational Shift

The new guard is in control at the National Association of Advancement for Colored People (NAACP) with the appointment of its new Chairwoman, Roslyn Brock.  Heading the policymaking arm of the organization, at 44, Brock is the first woman and the youngest person to hold the post.

“I’m proud to be a part of a younger generation, along with President and CEO Benjamin Jealous, that is taking on the leadership responsibilities of the NAACP,” said Brock in an e-mail.  “I’m also proud that I’ve been a part of the NAACP for 25 years, as a youth board member, Youth and College State Conference President, board member, and Vice Chair of the Board of Directors.”

Under the new leadership of Roslyn Brock, her top issues include:

Education: The future of our families and our country demands that we invest in an educational system in which every American has access to safe, accountable and effective schools.

Criminal Justice: The crisis of over-incarceration in this country is not only deeply unjust — it has been deeply unsuccessful. We must develop smarter strategies to keep our communities safe.

Health Care: Health care is a human right, and the NAACP will continue to fight for meaningful health care reform that benefits all Americans.

Economic Empowerment: We must help President Obama steer our nation back into economic health, and ensure that all Americans enjoy the benefits of living in a prosperous nation.

Civic Engagement: Engaged communities are safe and prosperous communities. Only an informed, empowered citizenry can bring stability and prosperity back to our communities.

To read more about Ms. Brock, visit The New York Times or Washington Post.

NAACP Names 44-Year-Old Woman to Chair Organization

Appointment Marks a Generational Shift

The new guard is in control at the National Association of Advancement for Colored People (NAACP) with the appointment of its new Chairwoman, Roslyn Brock.  Heading the policymaking arm of the organization, at 44, Brock is the first woman and the youngest person to hold the post.

“I’m proud to be a part of a younger generation, along with President and CEO Benjamin Jealous, that is taking on the leadership responsibilities of the NAACP,” said Brock in an e-mail.  “I’m also proud that I’ve been a part of the NAACP for 25 years, as a youth board member, Youth and College State Conference President, board member, and Vice Chair of the Board of Directors.”

Under the new leadership of Roslyn Brock, her top issues include:

Education: The future of our families and our country demands that we invest in an educational system in which every American has access to safe, accountable and effective schools.

Criminal Justice: The crisis of over-incarceration in this country is not only deeply unjust — it has been deeply unsuccessful. We must develop smarter strategies to keep our communities safe.

Health Care: Health care is a human right, and the NAACP will continue to fight for meaningful health care reform that benefits all Americans.

Economic Empowerment: We must help President Obama steer our nation back into economic health, and ensure that all Americans enjoy the benefits of living in a prosperous nation.

Civic Engagement: Engaged communities are safe and prosperous communities. Only an informed, empowered citizenry can bring stability and prosperity back to our communities.

To read more about Ms. Brock, visit The New York Times or Washington Post.